Carpal Tunnel Syndrome – What You Need to Know

Hello, there are many health issues that many people have but may not even know what it is, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is one of those health problem. Having gone through this medical problem made me to research about it and then share what I found out with you. Below is an important health information about Carpel Tunnel Syndrome which appeared on a medical journal . Read it for yourself and then spread the information to your family and friend because knowledge is our most important power for defense against sickness.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome – Topic Overview

What is carpal tunnel syndrome?

Carpal tunnel syndrome is pain, tingling, and other problems in your hand because of pressure on the median nerve in your wrist.

The median nerve and several tendons run from your forearm to your hand through a small space in your wrist called the carpal tunnel. The median nerve controls movement and feeling camera in your thumb and first three fingers (not your little finger).

See a picture of the carpal tunnel camera.

What causes carpal tunnel syndrome?

Pressure on the median nerve causes carpal tunnel syndrome. This pressure can come from swelling or anything that makes the carpal tunnel smaller. Things that can lead to carpal tunnel syndrome include:

What are the symptoms?

Carpal tunnel syndrome can cause tingling, numbness, weakness, or pain in the fingers or hand. Some people may have pain in their arm between their hand and their elbow.

Symptoms most often occur in the thumb, index finger, middle finger, and half of the ring finger. If you have problems with your other fingers but your little finger is fine, this may be a sign that you have carpal tunnel syndrome. A different nerve gives feeling to the little finger.

You may first notice symptoms at night. You may be able to get relief by shaking your hand.

How is carpal tunnel syndrome diagnosed?

Your doctor will do a physical exam and ask about your health and activities. You also may have some tests.

Your doctor will ask if you have any health problems-such as arthritis, hypothyroidism, or diabetes-or if you are pregnant. He or she will ask if you recently hurt your wrist, arm, or neck. Your doctor will want to know about your daily routine and any recent activities that could have hurt your wrist.

During the exam, your doctor will check the feeling, strength, and appearance of your neck, shoulders, arms, wrists, and hands.

Your doctor may suggest tests, such as:

  • Blood tests to see if any health problems might be causing your symptoms.
  • Nerve testing to find out if the median nerve is working as it should.

How is it treated?

Mild symptoms usually can be treated with home care. The sooner you start treatment, the better your chances of stopping symptoms and preventing long-term damage to the nerve.

You can do a few things at home to help your hand and wrist feel better:

  • Stop activities that cause numbness and pain. Rest your wrist longer between activities.
  • Ice your wrist for 10 to 15 minutes 1 or 2 times an hour. Try taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to relieve pain and reduce swelling.
  • Wear a wrist splint at night to keep your wrist in a neutral position. This takes pressure off your median nerve. Your wrist is in a neutral position when it is straight or only slightly bent. Holding a glass of water is an example of your wrist in a neutral position.

See your doctor if your symptoms do not get better after 1 to 2 weeks of home care, or if you have had bad symptoms from the start. You may need medicine for carpal tunnel syndrome or for a health problem that made you likely to get carpal tunnel syndrome.

Surgery is an option. But it’s usually used only when symptoms are so bad that you can’t work or do other things even after several weeks to months of other treatment.

During surgery, the doctor cuts the ligament at the top of the carpal tunnel. This makes more room in the tunnel and relieves pressure on the nerve. Surgery usually works to ease symptoms. But in some cases it does not completely get rid of numbness or pain.

How can you keep carpal tunnel syndrome from coming back?

To keep carpal tunnel syndrome from coming back, take care of your basic health. Stay at a healthy weight. Don’t smoke. Exercise to stay strong and flexible. If you have a long-term health problem, such as arthritis or diabetes, follow your doctor’s advice for keeping your condition under control.

You can also try to take good care of your wrists and hands:

  • Try to keep your wrist in a neutral position.
  • Use your whole hand-not just your fingers-to hold objects.
  • When you type, keep your wrists straight, with your hands a little higher than your wrists. Relax your shoulders when your arms are at your sides.
  • If you can, switch hands often when you repeat movements.

Check out:

http://www.sarfre.com/safreblog/carpal-tunnel-syndrome-what-you-need-to-know

Frequently Asked Questions

Learning about carpal tunnel syndrome:
Being diagnosed:
Getting treatment:
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About safrebiz

I am a graduate of the University of Southern California (USC), trained and experienced in healthcare management, pharmacotherapy, drug information, Clinical Pharmacy, business management and communication as a former Toastmaster. I like belonging to progressive and problem-solving groups, meeting new people and volunteering. I am a faithful believer and disciple of Jesus Christ because of his atoning sacrifice and unmerited grace offered to humanity. Because of the love of Christ we have hope of salvation from this sinful world. One of my best inspirational biblical quote is "God is our refuge and strength, always ready to help in times of trouble" Psalm 46:1
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One Response to Carpal Tunnel Syndrome – What You Need to Know

  1. Ndubuisi O. says:

    Thanks for the information, it’s very enlightening and educational.

    Liked by 1 person

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